The best collections from London Fashion Week AW22

0

“Hello girls! Welcome to London! Yes it is already that time of year, when our beautiful hometown comes alive in style. A long-running melting pot of bold creativity and names to know, London Fashion Week’s AW22 edition – the second full physical iteration since you-know-what – is shaping up to be one of the most intriguing yet. . With once star presences absent from this season’s schedule, the responsibility to dazzle falls firmly on a new generation of talent that has obsessed us since leaving school – names like Supriya Lele, Stefan Cooke, Ahluwalia, Saul Nash, Conner Ives, Feben…the list goes on!

Like last season, the place to get all the must-have news on the hottest LFW meauxments is, well, right here. Every day during the week we’ll be posting a new batch of reviews, keeping you up to date with everything you need to be able to tell you Nensi Dojakas of you Nicholas Daleys. Wide-eyed, my loves! xo

Saul Nash

Burdened with the honor of officially opening the week’s proceedings was Saul Nash. Prefaced by a film by FX Goby – “exploring the spirituality and folklore that binds communities together”, a statement read, shot in the context of a Kensal Rise hair salon – it was a collection that explored the emotional qualities that cultivate a sense of belonging. For Saul, this involved investigating his own ties to Guyana, his mother’s country of origin and whose culture deeply shaped his experience growing up in North London. Sporty collarless tunics bore the name of the country, twinsets came in blurs of palm green, canary yellow and burnt umber, and prints depicting Iemanja, a water deity who features in many folk traditions Afro-Caribbean. Where the designer’s biggest strides have been made, however, is in expanding his sartorial mandate to include tailoring, flexing his already well-tested tailoring skills with his first-ever suit, a sleazy silhouette crafted in wool. combat mate with detachable sleeves. MRS

Image courtesy of Saul Nash

Saul Nash AW22 - 4.jpg

Image courtesy of Saul Nash

Saul Nash AW22 - 8.jpg

Image courtesy of Saul Nash

Saul Nash AW22 - 12.jpg

Image courtesy of Saul Nash

Saul Nash AW22 - 14.jpg

Image courtesy of Saul Nash

Saul Nash AW22 - 16.jpg

Image courtesy of Saul Nash

Saul Nash AW22 - 19.jpg

Image courtesy of Saul Nash

Harris Reed

Last night, before the official start of London Fashion Week, Harris Reed held her own fashion show. Sam Smith portrayed Desiree Kiss you, as a symphony of models twisted and posed amidst an Elyos array of stars and clouds. It was Harris’ vision of fashion heaven, a place where trailing dresses are done in plush fabrics and worn by flowing Glamazons. Now in its third season – though Harris is no stranger to one-off collaborations and residencies – the collection marks a bold step in the development of Harris’ eponymous brand. Rather than designing ready-to-wear to be stocked at wholesale retailers, the California-born designer is building a couture-like business model, creating unique pieces to sell as custom pieces for VIP customers. This collection, titled ‘60 years of queen‘, takes its name from Sir Herbert Maxwell’s 1897 book on the reign of Queen Victoria. Hence the sense of Victorian opulence: corseted silhouettes juxtaposed with wide lapel seams, jewel tones (of the crown), richly textured brocades and ginormous taffeta bows and even larger hats. Remarkably, much of it has been made from recycled materials – albeit sourced from the century-old upholstery company Bussandri in northern Italy. Part Glam Rock, part Victoriana – there’s a sense of Byronic revival seen in the 60s, when Mick Jagger and all donned ruffles and Victorian blouses as a way to reframe male identity. Today, Harris’ designs speak to a conversation not just about gender fluidity, but about the purpose of fashion within a larger cultural space. Of course, these clothes are not intended for everyday life – and they will not form the basis of a work wardrobe – but they will resonate through images and videos on the World Wide Web, and will probably make red carpet appearances during awards season. The clouds are where these clothes belong! O.A.

Watch 1_Harris Reed_February 22_Marc Hibbert.jpg

Photography Marc Hibbert. Image courtesy of Harris Reed

Watch 2_Harris Reed_February 22_Marc Hibbert.jpg

Photography Marc Hibbert. Image courtesy of Harris Reed

Watch 4_Harris Redd_February 22_Marc Hibbert.jpg

Photography Marc Hibbert. Image courtesy of Harris Reed

Watch 6_Harris Reed_February 22_Marc Hibbert.jpg

Photography Marc Hibbert. Image courtesy of Harris Reed

Watch 7_Harris Reed_February 22_Marc Hibbertjpg.jpg

Photography Marc Hibbert. Image courtesy of Harris Reed

Watch 8_Harris Reed_February 22.jpg

Photography Marc Hibbert. Image courtesy of Harris Reed

Watch 9_Harris Reed_February 22_Marc Hibbert.jpg

Photography Marc Hibbert. Image courtesy of Harris Reed

Charles Jeffrey Loverboy

Although it hasn’t necessarily been at the forefront of the brand’s message, music has always been an essential facet of Charles Jeffrey Loverboy. From its early days as a sartorial ambassador for gay parties in East London’s queer basements to its current status as one of the city’s most ambitious young houses, the brand’s proudly outgoing looks – filled with punk house tartans, flippant silhouettes and delightfully undone knits – have always been one to evoke a distinct affect – a sound playing in your head. This is especially true for ‘Art of Noise’, the brand’s extensive AW22 collection.

Socket Wild Combination: A Portrait of Arthur Russell, a documentary about the late artist and cellist, as a starting point, this season sees Charles and his team explore the cultural and phenomenological spirit of music through a triptych of clothing movement. “The Physical” includes looks that draw on the tactics of cubist artists such as Pablo Picasso and Claes Oldenberg, referencing the shapes of musical instruments to create the undulating outlines of heavy woolen plaid coats and a fluted tartan skirt. The looks of “The Cultural” reference the lives of the musicians themselves, particularly iconoclastic No Wave artists like Lydia Lunch and James Chance, who emerged in late ’70s post-punk New York. . And then ‘The Emotional’ features what are by far the most figurative pieces in the collection, each the product of an attempt to give shape to the feelings the music evokes – think sequin cropped tops and statement clothing. boxy monogrammed fleece exterior in primary hues; pleated tartan separates and scribble-embroidered tulle ruffles. MRS

00001-charles-jeffrey-loverboy-fall-22-RTW-credit-brand.jpg

Image courtesy of Charles Jeffrey Loverboy

00005-charles-jeffrey-loverboy-fall-22-RTW-credit-brand.jpg

Image courtesy of Charles Jeffrey Loverboy

00008-charles-jeffrey-loverboy-fall-22-RTW-credit-brand.jpg

Image courtesy of Charles Jeffrey Loverboy

00012-charles-jeffrey-loverboy-fall-22-RTW-credit-brand.jpg

Image courtesy of Charles Jeffrey Loverboy

00027-charles-jeffrey-loverboy-fall-22-RTW-credit-brand.jpg

Image courtesy of Charles Jeffrey Loverboy

00041-charles-jeffrey-loverboy-fall-22-RTW-credit-brand.jpg

Image courtesy of Charles Jeffrey Loverboy

00043-charles-jeffrey-loverboy-fall-22-RTW-credit-brand.jpg

Image courtesy of Charles Jeffrey Loverboy

Paolina Russo

Penny suburban streets are hardly where you’d expect a Final Fantasywarrior princess to materialize, but in Paolina Russo’s latest collection, that’s where she appears. Entitled Relics, the London-based Canadian designer brings the fierce video game-tinged muse that has been central to her creative vision to the suburban streets she herself grew up on. The designer’s clingy rib-knit bodysuits, leggings and long-sleeve tops have been reimagined in earth-toned single-fiber wool yarns reminiscent of the colors of beaten grass. Elsewhere, an athletic poise is felt in miniskirts and low midi skirts that protrude sharply from the thigh and corsets recycled from trainers, while cropped Fair Isle ponchos swaddle the shoulders like pieces of fabric armor. twee. Comfortable and ready for battle? Now it’s what is called classy. MRS

Paolina Russo AW 22 1.jpg

Photography James Robjant. Image courtesy of Paolina Russo

Paolina Russo AW 22 3.jpg

Photography James Robjant. Image courtesy of Paolina Russo

Paolina Russo AW 22 6.jpg

Photography James Robjant. Image courtesy of Paolina Russo

Paolina Russo AW 22 8.jpg

Photography James Robjant. Image courtesy of Paolina Russo

Paolina Russo AW 22 12.jpg

Photography James Robjant. Image courtesy of Paolina Russo

Paolina Russo AW 22 13.jpg

Photography James Robjant. Image courtesy of Paolina Russo

Follow iD on instagram and ICT Tac for more fashion reviews.

Share.

Comments are closed.